Players who were drafted more than once

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Players who were drafted more than once

Postby MCT » Thu Dec 09, 2010 3:23 am

Ray recently started a thread about Kresimir Cosic by asking why Cosic was drafted twice. In response to some comments I made in that thread, Tomislav (tpakrac) PM’ed me and asked if I had a list of every player who was drafted twice. I do have some lists, although they are limited to players who went on to play in the NBA or ABA. I thought I'd post them here in case others were interested.

Historically, many players who were drafted twice were drafted the first time as juniors, under the old “junior eligible” rule, then went back to school for their senior year and were drafted again as seniors. In case anyone isn’t familiar with the junior eligible rule, here’s a quick overview:

The rule existed from some time in the early 1950s -- I'm not sure exactly what the first year was -- until 1979. It applied to college players for whom four years had elapsed since their high school class graduated (making them eligible to be drafted under the so-called "four-year rule"), but who still had college eligibility remaining. The usual scenario was a player who had missed a year due to injury, sitting out a season after transferring from one school to another, or temporary ineligibility. Affected players were called junior eligibles because those who fell under it were usually juniors. Under the right circumstances, it was possible for a freshman or sophomore to qualify as well, however.

From at least the mid ‘50s up through 1975, if a team drafted a junior eligible and he elected to return to school, the team lost the player’s rights as soon as he went back to school, and he would be eligible for the draft again the following year. Starting in 1976, the team had until the following year’s draft to sign the player, but if they did not, he would be eligible for the draft again. After the 1979 draft, the junior eligible rule was abolished.

The ABA seems to have had its own version of the junior eligible rule, although I’m not sure if they used that terminology; such players are shown as “redshirts” on ABA draft lists. The ABA rule worked differently from the contemporary NBA rule: if an ABA team drafted a player as a junior eligible, they generally held his rights permanently, with no opportunity for the player to be drafted again after his senior year (there was actually an early version of the NBA rule that was similar). As a result, junior eligibles were not typically eligible for the ABA Draft more than once.

Lists to follow....
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Postby MCT » Thu Dec 09, 2010 3:25 am

1) The first list includes players who I am fairly certain were junior eligibles the first time they were drafted. These players' college stats are available either in the NBA Register or on Matt Mauer's The Draft Review web site. In most cases, it is apparent from the player's college record that he was a junior eligible the first time he was drafted. Some players are also explicitly identified as junior eligibles in older editions of the NBA Register.

K.C. Jones -- Lakers 1955 (round not specified), Celtics 2nd round 1956. Missed almost all of 1953-54 season due to medical reasons, granted extra year of eligibility by NCAA.

Sam Jones -- Lakers 1956 (round not specified), Celtics 1st round 1957. In military service for two years between junior and senior years of college; missed entire 1954-55 and 1955-56 seasons as a result. Was presumably eligible for 1955 draft as well but there is no record that he was selected.

Elgin Baylor -- Lakers 1956 (round not specified), Lakers 1st round 1958. Baylor was apparently in the military service for two years between high school and college, so he was four years out of high school in 1956 and therefore eligible for the draft, even though he had played just one year of college basketball (1954-55, at College of Idaho; he sat out the 1955-56 season after transferring to Seattle). He appears to have been eligible for the draft again in 1957, after his sophomore season, but there is no record he was selected. In 1958, following his junior season, Baylor was the #1 overall pick in the open phase of the draft, and elected to turn pro. Baylor is one of only two players I know of to be drafted more than once under the junior eligible rule, and one of only three I know of to be drafted as a “junior eligible” prior to his junior year of college.

Steve Hamilton -- Warriors 9th round 1957, Lakers 2nd round 1958. Hamilton is another convoluted case. Take a quick glance at his college record on The Draft Review and you’ll see an easy explanation why he was a junior eligible -- he transferred from Purdue to Morehead State following his freshman year, and sat out a season. Look more closely, though, and you’ll notice that he played a full four seasons at Morehead State after transferring (six years elapsed between the time he started and finished his college career; he is shown on Purdue’s freshman team in 1952-53, sat out 1953-54, then was at Morehead State from 1954-55 to 1957-58). How was he able to do that? Did he not actually attend school/play basketball at Purdue? Was Morehead State was not subject to the freshman prohibition, and didn’t count time spent on a non-varsity team at another school towards a player’s four years of college eligibility? In any event, Hamilton was at least four years out of high school in 1957, so he was a junior eligible. If the timeline on The Draft Review is correct, he should have been eligible for the 1956 draft as well, but there is no record that he was selected.

York Larese -- Hawks 6th round 1960, Packers 2nd round 1961. Missed 1957-58 season due to injury.

Kevin Loughery -- Knicks 11th round 1961, Pistons 2nd round 1962. Sat out 1959-60 season after transferring from Boston College to St. John’s.

Roger Strickland -- Celtics 4th round 1962, Lakers 1st round 1963. Sat out 1959-60 season after transferring from Notre Dame to Jacksonville.

Fred Crawford -- Knicks 8th round 1963, Knicks 4th round 1964. Missed 1961-62 season due to illness.

Larry Jones -- Lakers 5th round 1963, 76ers 3rd round 1964. Appears to have missed almost all of 1962-63 season for some reason (injury or illness?) and was presumably granted extra year of eligibility.

Ira Harge -- Pistons 7th round 1963, 76ers 2nd round 1964. Initially enrolled as a college freshman at Bowling Green in fall of 1959, but apparently left school, then started over again at a juco the following year.

Jerry Sloan -- Bullets 3rd round 1964, Bullets 1st round 1965. Initially enrolled as a college freshman at Illinois in fall of 1960, but left school before the start of basketball season, then started over at Evansville the following year.

Henry Finkel -- Lakers 4th round 1964, 76ers 4th round 1965, Lakers 2nd round 1966. I’m unclear on some of the details, but Finkel took a very convoluted route between high school and the pros. He apparently graduated from high school in 1960, but did not enroll in college until the 1961-62 school year, then left school and/or transferred and did not play in 1962-63. As a result, in 1964 he was four years out of high school and therefore eligible for the draft, even though he still had two years of college eligibility remaining. He was drafted again after his junior year, and again after his senior year. Finkel is one of only two players I know of to be drafted three times, and one of only three I know of to be drafted as a “junior eligible” prior to his junior year of college.

Bill Turner – Knicks 9th round 1966, Warriors 3rd round 1967. Sat out 1963-64 season because he was ineligible.

Edgar Lacy – Celtics 7th round 1967, Warriors 4th round 1968. Sat out 1966-67 season for reasons that are unclear.

Mike Lynn – Warriors 5th round 1967, Bulls 4th round 1968. Sat out 1966-67 season for reasons that are unclear.

Gary Gregor – Knicks 3rd round 1967, Suns 1st round 1968. Sat out 1965-66 season because he was academically ineligible.

Bud Ogden – Sonics 13th round 1968, 76ers 1st round 1969. Missed 1965-66 season due to injuries sustained in an automobile accident.

Julius Keye – Celtics 8th round 1968, Celtics 3rd round 1969. Sat out 1966-67 season after transferring from South Carolina State to Alcorn A&M.

Hal Booker – Knicks 5th round 1968, Sonics 4th round 1969. Sat out 1967-68 season because he was academically ineligible.

Mike Grosso – 76ers 3rd round 1969, Bucks 5th round 1970. Sat out 1966-67 season; initially declared academically ineligible at South Carolina, then transferred to Louisville.

Harvey Catchings – 76ers 9th round 1973, 76ers 3rd round 1974. Took a redshirt year during the 1970-71 season after transferring into Hardin-Simmons from a juco (Weatherford College).

Leonard Gray – Hawks 3rd round 1973, Sonics 2nd round 1974. Sat out 1970-71 season after transferring from Kansas to Long Beach State.

Kevin Stacom – Bulls 2nd round 1973, Celtics 2nd round 1974. Sat out 1971-72 season after transferring from Holy Cross to Providence.

Andre McCarter – Cavaliers 8th round 1975, Kings 6th round 1976. Sat out 1972-73 season for reasons that are unclear (took redshirt year in lieu of first season of varsity eligibility?).

Phil Hicks – Blazers 4th round 1975, Rockets 2nd round 1976. Sat out 1972-73 season after transferring from Loyola (La.), first to Long Beach State, then to Tulane.

Billy Reid – Pacers 5th round 1979, Warriors 9th round 1980. Sat out 1977-78 season after transferring from New Mexico to San Francisco.

Mark Eaton – Clippers 5th round 1979, Jazz 4th round 1982. Eaton was out of school for three years between high school and college, so he was four years out of high school in 1979 and therefore eligible for the draft, even though he had played just one year of college basketball, at a juco. Because the junior eligible rule was abolished after 1979, Eaton was not eligible for the draft again until he completed his college eligibility at UCLA in 1982. One of only three players I know of to be drafted as a “junior eligible” prior to his junior year of college.

2) The next list includes players who were definitely juniors the first time they were drafted (and thus were presumably junior eligibles), but I don’t know why they were junior eligibles. As with the players on the first list, these players’ college stats are available either in the NBA Register or on The Draft Review web site. Unlike the players on the first list, there is nothing in those sources that identifies these players as junior eligibles in the year they were first drafted, or indicates why they would have been junior eligibles. If these players were in fact junior eligibles, whatever interruption they experienced must have happened before they started college. A few possibilities include spending a year in prep school, spending time in the military, not being considered a college basketball prospect right out of high school, or just plain deciding to take time off.

I have to wonder if some of them weren’t really eligible, though, especially those taken in the lower rounds. Maybe there was some confusion over the player’s status. Could the selection have even been just the creative use of a throwaway pick as a publicity stunt, in some cases? (“You mean that [Purdue star Herm Gilliam][prominent local small college player Randy Smith] isn’t eligible until next year? We had no idea! How about that, he’s only played three years of college ball, not four -- I guess we just lost count! Well, that explains why he was still available in the [13th][14th] round. We better go hold a press conference to tell the media that we “accidentally” drafted [Purdue star Herm Gilliam][prominent local small college player Randy Smith] in the [13th][14th] round. Hey, it’s not every year that we have to hold a press conference to talk about our [13th][14th] round pick!”)

John Cox -- Knicks 4th round 1958, Knicks 4th round 1959.

Ben Warley -- Lakers 4th round 1959, Nationals 1st round 1960. Warley is a bit of an odd case. As far as I can tell, he only played three years of college basketball, which were at Tennessee State from 1956-57 and 1958-59. He then played AAU ball in 1959-60. I strongly suspect that he was a junior eligible in 1959, simply because if he wasn’t, I don‘t think he would have been eligible to be drafted again in 1960.

Doug Moe -- Pistons 7th round 1960, Packers 2nd round 1961. Moe attended a prep school at some point; did he go for a year between high school and college?

Jerry Harkness -- Nationals 8th round 1962, Knicks 2nd round 1963.

Loy Petersen – Bullets 17th round 1967, Bulls 2nd round 1968.

Ed Biedenbach – Hawks 9th round 1967, Lakers 4th round 1968.

John Baum – Lakers 15th round 1968, Bulls 2nd round 1969.

Herm Gilliam – Bulls 13th round 1968, Royals 1st round 1969.

Wally Anderzunas – Pistons 6th round 1968, Hawks 2nd round 1969.

Jake Ford – Royals 5th round 1969, Sonics 2nd round 1970.

Randy Smith – Pistons 14th round 1970, Braves 7th round 1971.

Steve Patterson – Suns 8th round 1970, Cavaliers 2nd round 1971.

Bayard Forrest – Suns 3rd round 1975, Sonics 2nd round 1976.

Phil Walker – 76ers 7th round 1976, Bullets 2nd round 1977.

3) The next list includes players whose complete college record is not available in a source like the NBA Register or The Draft Review. These players may have been junior eligibles the first time they were drafted, or they may not have been; I don’t know one way or the other.

Paul Long – Hawks 15th round 1966, Pistons 5th round 1967. Reference sources indicate that Long played at two different colleges (Virginia Tech and Wake Forest); he may have sat out a year as a transfer.

Roland West – Bullets 8th round 1966, Bullets 20th round 1967.

Wayne Chapman – 76ers 16th round 1967, Bullets 9th round 1968.

Carl Fuller – Hawks 7th round 1967, Pistons 5th round 1968.

Ron Sanford – Royals 4th round 1969, Lakers 14th round 1970.

Ben Kelso – Pistons 8th round 1972, Pistons 8th round 1973.

Charlie Edge – Suns 6th round 1972, Knicks 11th round 1973.

Roy McPipe – Lakers 8th round 1973, Bullets 6th round 1974.

4) The last list includes players who I am fairly certain were not junior eligibles. Details are provided below.

Reggie Harding -- Pistons 4th round 1962, Pistons 6th round 1963. This was an odd situation which we once discussed on the old Yahoo board. Harding never attended college. The Pistons drafted him in 1962 under the terms of an archaic rule which allowed a player who had never attended college to be drafted once one year had elapsed since his high school class graduated (this rule was on the books at least through the mid ‘60s, possibly later, though it was rarely invoked). Harding’s eligibility was challenged by other teams, however. The complicating factor was that he had attended three different institutions but had not graduated from any of them, making it hard to determine exactly what year his high school class had graduated. Those challenging Harding’s eligibility noted that he had attended (and played basketball at) a prep school for a short time during the 1961-62 school year, arguing that since he was still theoretically working towards a high school diploma at that point, he couldn’t possibly be eligible for the draft in 1962. The Pistons argued that prep school wasn’t the same as high school, pointing out that Harding had last attended a regular high school in the 1960-61 school year, and that his original freshman class in the Detroit public schools had graduated in 1961. According to the discussion on the old board, the NBA ruling was a split decision, allowing the Pistons to keep Harding’s rights but forbidding him from playing in the NBA until the 1963-64 season. (If you think about it, that really doesn’t make any sense -- if he wasn’t eligible in 1962, the Pistons shouldn’t have been able to keep his rights; if he was eligible in 1962, the Pistons should have been able to play him right away.) Based on that, I’m not sure why the Pistons drafted him again in 1963. Maybe just to leave no doubt that they still held his rights?

Joe Pace – Suns 5th round 1975, Bullets 2nd round 1976. Another strange case. Pace was a junior in 1975, but he wasn’t a junior eligible. It appears that he applied for early entry in 1975 as a “hardship” case, then was somehow allowed to return to college for the 1975-76 season. Pace appears on lists of hardship candidates for the ’75 draft, but I’ve never found any explanation of how he subsequently ended up back in college.

Ralph Drollinger – Celtics 7th round 1976, Nets 8th round 1977, Sonics 5th round 1978. Drollinger was a senior in 1976. He spent the next four years playing for Athletes in Action, so he retained his amateur status and was able to be drafted again each year. He is one of only two players I know of to be drafted three times (Henry Finkel is the other). He may have been eligible for the 1979 draft as well, but wasn’t selected (which would have wiped out his draft rights from the previous year and left him in the position of an undrafted free agent). Drollinger ultimately signed with the expansion Mavericks franchise the day before the 1980 draft.

Lars Hansen – Bulls 3rd round 1976, Lakers 7th round 1977. Hansen was a senior in 1976. He played professionally in Italy during the 1976-77 season, so I don’t think he was actually eligible in 1977, and I suspect that the Lakers’ selection of him was ultimately voided. Maybe there was some confusion over his status at the time of the draft.

Kim Anderson – Blazers 2nd round 1977, Bucks 7th round 1978. Similar to Hansen, Anderson was a senior in 1978, then played professionally in Europe in 1977-78, so he shouldn‘t have been eligible in 1978. While researching transactions a couple of years ago, I came across a newspaper article indicating that the Bucks’ selection of Anderson had been voided, with the Blazers still retaining his rights. Anderson ended up playing for the Blazers in 1978-79.

Manute Bol -- Clippers 5th round 1983, Bullets 2nd round 1985. The Clippers’ selection of Bol in 1983 was later voided because it was determined that he was not old enough to be eligible for the draft (at the time, foreign players who had not played at a North American high school or college needed to be at least 21 at the time of the draft, but Bol did not turn 21 until October 1983). There was apparently some confusion over Bol’s date of birth. Bol later enrolled at the University of Bridgeport, and after playing one year there, entered the 1985 draft.

Arvydas Sabonis -- Hawks 4th round 1985, Blazers 1st round 1986. Similar to Bol, Sabonis did not turn 21 until December 1985, so the Hawks’ selection of him was later voided. We discussed Sabonis' drafting in another thread recently; the Hawks either 1) didn’t know Sabonis’ age or 2) knew how old he was but selected him anyway as some kind of publicity stunt.
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Postby Bruce Kitts » Thu Dec 09, 2010 4:22 pm

Don't know if your list is supposed to include players drafted twice who didn't go into the NBA, but if it does, add:

Bruno Boin, University of Washington, drafted in the 9th round in 1958 by St. Louis and in the 10th round in 1959 by Detroit. Boin redshirted after his junior year so that he would be a senior the year Washington came off probation. During that off year he played for the Buchan Bakers of the NIBL. He also played for them after graduating, choosing to get his masters degree and pursue a career rather than trying out for the NBA.
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Postby rlee » Thu Dec 09, 2010 7:00 pm

Don Newman (LSU/Idaho) drafted as jr.eligible by Indiana in 4th round (1979) & then by Boston in the 3rd rd (1980)
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Postby MCT » Thu Dec 09, 2010 9:51 pm

The lists that I posted only include players who went on to play in the NBA or ABA, but we're interested in identifying players who didn't (like Boin and Newman) as well.
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Postby Bruce Kitts » Thu Dec 09, 2010 11:58 pm

I think when Elgin Baylor was drafted by the Lakers in 1956, they had no idea whether he was eligible to be drafted or not. Believe it or not, the NBA was not the smooth operation it is today. As far as I know, his time between high school and college did not include the military.
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Postby Robert Bradley » Fri Dec 10, 2010 5:19 am

After the Junior Eligible rule ended in 1979, four players who would have qualified under the old rule were selected by teams in 1980. The four choices were all voided by the league -

Charles Jones, Vanderbilt, by Los Angeles (selected by Washington in 1981)
Frank Johnson, Wake Forest, by Denver (Selected by Washington in 1981)
Steve Johnson, Oregon State, by Detroit (Selected by Kansas City in 1981)
Rudy Macklin, Louisiana State, by New Jersey (selected by Atlanta in 1981)
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Postby Robert Bradley » Fri Dec 10, 2010 5:39 am

In July, 1962 the Pistons announced that the league had ruled Harding ineligible to play until the 1963-64 season, with Detroit holding his rights.

I found an article from May, 1963 which states that Detroit had to draft him again as part of the agreement with the NBA.

Harding played the 1962-63 season with the Midwest Basketball League's Holland Oilers.
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Postby rlee » Fri Dec 10, 2010 7:49 am

Dick Garmaker:

1954 - 9th Round - Lakers
1955 - Territorial pick - Lakers
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Postby rlee » Fri Dec 10, 2010 8:06 am

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Postby rlee » Fri Dec 10, 2010 8:24 am

Bobby Joe Mason:


1959 - 5th Round - Lakers
1960 - 6th Round - Royals
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Postby MCT » Fri Dec 10, 2010 8:27 pm

Bruce Kitts wrote:I think when Elgin Baylor was drafted by the Lakers in 1956, they had no idea whether he was eligible to be drafted or not. Believe it or not, the NBA was not the smooth operation it is today. As far as I know, his time between high school and college did not include the military.

I may be mistaken about Baylor being in the military during that period. It was one of the few things in my post that I did not get directly from the NBA Register or from The Draft Review; I thought I had read it in a discussion here. Does anyone know of any source that would document what year Baylor finished high school? That would at least establish whether he was really eligible in '56.

It would not surprise me if some of the players on the lists that I posted, particularly those on lists 2 and 3, were not actually eligible (some of the players on list 4 definitely weren't). I can certainly see teams using a lower-round pick on a player who they weren't really sure was eligible.

I don't know how teams kept track in those days of who was a junior eligible. If a very well-known college player had circumstances in his background that would make him a junior eligible, that would probably be common knowledge among pro scouts, but I don't know how they tracked this for players in more obscure circumstances. Looked at another way, after the '58 NCAA finals I'm sure that everyone knew that Baylor was eligible that year, but I don't know how anyone would have known whether he was eligible in '56.
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Postby MCT » Fri Dec 10, 2010 8:48 pm

Robert Bradley wrote:After the Junior Eligible rule ended in 1979, four players who would have qualified under the old rule were selected by teams in 1980. The four choices were all voided by the league -

Charles Jones, Vanderbilt, by Los Angeles (selected by Washington in 1981)
Frank Johnson, Wake Forest, by Denver (Selected by Washington in 1981)
Steve Johnson, Oregon State, by Detroit (Selected by Kansas City in 1981)
Rudy Macklin, Louisiana State, by New Jersey (selected by Atlanta in 1981)

These teams made the above selections because the NBA Players' Association had challenged the league's authority to unilaterally abolish the junior eligible rule, taking the matter to a "Special Master" appointed under the Oscar Robertson lawsuit settlement to arbitrate disputes between the owners and the players. As of the time the 1980 draft was held, a final decision had not yet been handed down. The teams were apparently hedging their bets against the possibility that the ruling might come down in favor of the players, in which case these picks would presumably be reinstated. If that happened, the teams would control these players' draft rights until the day of the 1981 draft. None of the selections listed above were made any higher than the 7th round, so it was a reasonable gamble, since the teams weren't likely to have gotten anything of much value out of the picks anyway. The ruling was ultimately in favor of the owners, so the picks were never reinstated.

Technically, these players didn't go on the books as having been drafted in 1980. The NBA apparently declared the picks ineligible before the final draft list was publicly released, so they have never appeared in official draft lists for that year, and aren't counted in the order of selection (the picks are shown as "selected ineligible player"). Officially, these players were drafted only once, in 1981. I agree that they deserve mention in a discussion of players who were drafted twice, though, due to the unusual circumstances.

All four players would have been junior eligibles because they had missed almost all of a season due to injury, and had been granted an extra year of eligibility by the NCAA (oddly, none missed the entire season in question; all appeared in at least one game before getting hurt). IINM, there were some additional junior eligibles selected in the later rounds of the 1980 draft, then similarly voided, but the four players listed above were the only ones of the group who went on to play in the NBA. I don't have a list of the others, so I'm not sure if any were also drafted in 1981.
Last edited by MCT on Sat Dec 11, 2010 2:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby MCT » Fri Dec 10, 2010 9:14 pm

MCT wrote:3) The next list includes players whose complete college record is not available in a source like the NBA Register or The Draft Review. These players may have been junior eligibles the first time they were drafted, or they may not have been; I don’t know one way or the other.

.....

Ron Sanford – Royals 4th round 1969, Lakers 14th round 1970.

.....

I just realized that Sanford's college stats are in fact available on The Draft Review. His record indicates that he was a senior in 1969, so he definitely wasn't a junior eligible either of the years he was drafted. He should therefore be moved to list 4. Why he was selected again in 1970 isn't clear. Either he didn't sign a pro contract and retained his amateur status, or the Lakers were mistaken in their belief that he was eligible.
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Postby rlee » Fri Dec 10, 2010 10:36 pm

Patrick,

Baylor was class of '54 @ Spingarn High
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Postby mtamada » Sat Dec 11, 2010 6:08 am

rlee wrote:Patrick,

Baylor was class of '54 @ Spingarn High


So he was 19, almost 20, years old when he graduated from high school. Which is consistent with the observation made in a thread here several months ago that some players such as Baylor intentionally repeated a grade in order the get the equivalent of a redshirt year in high school.
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Postby MCT » Sat Dec 11, 2010 2:55 pm

If Baylor graduated from high school in '54, then he wouldn't have been eligible for the NBA Draft until 1958. So he wasn't really eligible in 1956, and his selection by the Lakers that year belongs on list 4 instead of list 1.

Bruce is probably correct that the Lakers had no idea whether Baylor was eligible when they drafted him in '56. Maybe his age made them think that he could have graduated from high school earlier and might therefore be eligible? Draft lists for this year are generally by team with no rounds indicated, so I don't think there is any record of what round Baylor was drafted in. But it looks to have been very late in the draft, with a pick that wasn't likely to yield much value anyway; in the list on the APBR site, Baylor is the fourteenth and last player on the Lakers' draft list.
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Postby Robert Bradley » Sat Dec 11, 2010 3:19 pm

rlee wrote:Dick Garmaker:

1954 - 9th Round - Lakers
1955 - Territorial pick - Lakers


Garmaker transferred from Hibbing Junior College to the University of Minnesota, sitting out the 1952-53 season.
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Postby Robert Bradley » Sat Dec 11, 2010 5:05 pm

Hank Finkel transferred from St. Peter's (NJ) to Dayton University in 1962, sitting out the 1962-63 season.
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Postby rlee » Sat Dec 11, 2010 5:36 pm

Much of Finkel's convoluted history is described here:

http://www.apbr.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=719
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Postby Robert Bradley » Sat Dec 11, 2010 6:12 pm

Bayard Forrest's playing career -

Prescott (AZ) High School 1969-70
Brandon (OR) High School 1970-72
Grand Canyon College 1972-76
Athletes in Action 1976-77
Phoenix Suns 1977-80 (sat out entire 1979-80 season)

I don't see any obvious explanation why he would have been available in the 1975 draft as a junior eligible or hardship case. (BTW - I live about a mile away from Grand Canyon University, and Prescott High School and my school, Sunnyslope High School, were in the Skyline Division together when I was there from 1977-81)
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Postby Robert Bradley » Sat Dec 11, 2010 7:20 pm

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Postby Robert Bradley » Sat Dec 11, 2010 7:50 pm

Steve Patterson played his freshman year at UCLA (1966-67), and then redshirted his sophomore year (1967-68) -

http://www.uclabruins.com/sports/m-bask ... 04aaa.html

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=Gh ... hirt&hl=en
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Postby Robert Bradley » Sat Dec 11, 2010 8:11 pm

Bobby Joe Mason was an academic redshirt at Bradley in 1955-56.

Ben Warley was drafted in 1960 and 1961. He played for the Cleveland Pipers's AAU club in 1960-61.
Author of THE BASKETBALL DRAFT FACT BOOK: A HISTORY OF PROFESSIONAL BASKETBALL'S COLLEGE DRAFTS
Available at https://Rowman.com

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Postby MCT » Mon Dec 13, 2010 5:00 pm


Following up the discussion in that thread, the CIS apparently allows five years of eligibility, so Fox was able to return to school and play a fifth year at St. Mary's after a three-year gap. I guess it's not surprising that Fox did so well against those American collegians -- he was several years older than most of them! I wonder if the Blazers realized how old he was.

In any event, Fox was legitimately drafted twice, but not because he was a junior eligible. He had already used up four years of college eligibility by the first time he was drafted, and is probably best classified as "retained amateur status".
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