Rescinded Trades

For all non-specific NBA-related discussion

Rescinded Trades

Postby Robert Bradley » Thu Oct 01, 2009 1:53 pm

Does anyone know of any others? I'm referring to trades that were actually completed and then canceled, not just agreed upon before one team backed out.


RESCINDED NBA TRADES

2Sep76 Portland trades Sidney Wicks to Utah for cash, trade rescinded when Wicks demanded a new contract

24Nov80 San Antonio trades John Shumate to Seattle for cash, trade rescinded 1Dec80 when Shumate failed his physical

22Jun86 Cleveland trades Keithe Lee to Portland for Jim Paxson, trade rescinded 22Jun86 when Lee failed his physical

20Jul92 Orlando trades Greg Kite to Houston for 1993 & 1996 second-round draft choices, trade rescinded 20Jul92 when Kite failed his physical

4Feb94 Detroit trades Sean Elliott to Houston for Robert Horry, Matt Bullard and two second-round draft choices, trade rescinded 7Feb04 when Elliott failed his physical

16Feb94 Detroit trades Olden Polynice and David Wood to Sacramento for Duane Causwell and three second-round draft choices, trade rescinded 19Feb94 when Causwell failed his physical

18Oct95 Toronto trades Victor Alexander to Cleveland for Harold Minor, a 1996 second-round draft choice and cash, trade rescinded 22Oct95 when Alexander failed his physical

20Jun97 Boston trades Dino Rajda to Philadelphia for Clarence Weatherspoon and Michael Cage, trade rescinded 24Jun97 when Rajda failed his physical

16Feb98 Utah trades Greg Foster, Chris Morris and a first-round draft choice to Orlando for Rony Seikaly, trade rescinded when Seikaly failed to report

9Feb00 Toronto traded Alvin Williams, Sean Marks and cash to Boston for Danny Fortson and a draft choice, trade rescinded 11Feb00 when Williams failed his physical

10Sep02 Cleveland trades Mateen Cleeves to Sacramento for Jurmaine Jones, trade rescinded 17Sep02 when Cleaves failed his physical

2Aug05 Portland trades Shareef Abdur-Rahim to New Jersey for a first-round draft choice, trade rescinded 9Aug05 when Abdur-Rahim failed his physical

1Feb06 Philadelphia trades Stephen Hunter to Charlotte for 2006 & 2007 second-round draft choices, trade rescinded 8Feb06 when Hunter failed his physical

17Feb09 Charlotte trades Tyson Chandler and the rights to DeVon Hardin to Oklahoma City for Joe Smith and Chris Wilcox, trade rescinded 18Feb09 when Chandler failed his physical
Last edited by Robert Bradley on Mon Jan 10, 2011 12:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
Author of THE BASKETBALL DRAFT FACT BOOK: A HISTORY OF PROFESSIONAL BASKETBALL'S COLLEGE DRAFTS
Available at https://Rowman.com

Robert Bradley's Pro Basketball History Revisited Blog
http://apbrbasketball.blogspot.com/
Robert Bradley
Emeritus
 
Posts: 1076
Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 5:39 am
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Postby MCT » Fri Oct 02, 2009 4:11 pm

A few days before the 1973 draft, the 76ers reportedly traded the #1 overall pick to the Bulls for Clifford Ray and "future considerations", which some sources indicate was intended to be Bob Weiss. The trade was cancelled the next day when Ray failed his physical. From articles that I've seen, it sounds like the trade was considered to be completed; there are a couple of free articles on the trade in Google News, if you want to see what was actually being reported. Philadelphia used the pick to take Doug Collins. IIRC, there was some suggestion in post-draft reporting that the Sixers didn't believe there were any franchise players in the draft, felt they would be better off trading the #1 pick for veteran help, and were disappointed that they got stuck with the pick in the end; even after the draft, they were supposedly still shopping Collins' rights.

Incidentally, this deal falling through further complicated a very messy draft season for the 76ers. They were also involved in a dispute with the league and the Sonics over compensation for Seattle having been allowed to sign John Brisker even though the 76ers held his NBA rights. To make a long story short, the Sixers felt that they were entitled to the Sonics' first-round pick (#4 overall); under the threat of legal action from the Sonics, the league wanted to instead give the Sixers a bonus pick to be tacked on to the end of the first round (#18 overall). The latter ultimately prevailed, but not before the date of the draft was pushed back a couple of times pending resolution of this issue. When the draft finally commenced, the 76ers actually tried to cut in and use the #4 pick to take Mike Bantom.

It's not quite the same thing, but when the Lakers traded Gary Payton to the Celtics in 2004, the Celtics got the Lakers to modify the trade under the threat of a possible recission. Under the terms of the original trade, Marcus Banks was one of the players sent to Los Angeles. The Lakers were also to receive a 2005 2nd round pick from Boston. The trade apparently contained a clause requiring all players to report and pass physicals by a certain date, however. Payton, who seemed surprised and upset with the trade and unsure whether he wanted to report to Boston at all, failed to report for a physical by the required date. As such, the Celtics could have rescinded the trade. In exchange for the Celtics not doing so, the Lakers agreed to modify the trade so that Banks and the second-round pick weren't included, but Jumaine Jones was added. The whole trade wasn't rescinded, but Marcus Banks' inclusion in it essentially was.

The John Shumate trade is interesting in that he actually appeared in a couple of games for his new team before the trade was rescinded. I don't know what the circumstances were, but I couldn't see this happening today unless there were extremely unusual circumstances involved. The player's new team wouldn't be allowed to use him in a game until he had passed his physical. Once he passed his physical, they'd be hard pressed to argue that they should be allowed to rescind.
MCT
 
Posts: 899
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 5:41 pm

Elliott and Horry

Postby JAB1234 » Sun Oct 04, 2009 1:38 pm

Quote "4Feb94 Detroit trades Sean Elliott to Houston for Robert Horry, Matt Bullard and two second-round draft choices, trade rescinded 7Feb04 when Elliott failed his physical" Quote

I wish that this trade would have went through. With Elliott in Houston, and Horry in Detroit, NBA history may be better because there would be several fewer Laker and Spur championships.
JAB1234
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2009 9:21 pm

Postby Robert Bradley » Mon Oct 05, 2009 3:22 pm

nice find. who would have thought clifford ray, a good defensive player who was good for 10 points and 11 rebounds a night was worth the first pick in the draft?

true, the '73 draft was considered to be a weak one, and i can see the bulls interest in collins since he had been a star downstate at illinois state, but that still seems like a pretty cheap price.
Author of THE BASKETBALL DRAFT FACT BOOK: A HISTORY OF PROFESSIONAL BASKETBALL'S COLLEGE DRAFTS
Available at https://Rowman.com

Robert Bradley's Pro Basketball History Revisited Blog
http://apbrbasketball.blogspot.com/
Robert Bradley
Emeritus
 
Posts: 1076
Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 5:39 am
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Postby MCT » Fri Jan 07, 2011 3:17 am

I mentioned this in another thread recently, but it's worth posting here as well:

According to newspaper articles in the Google News Archive, the Lakers traded the draft rights to Ben Warley to the Hawks on September 1, 1960 in exchange for Dave Gambee and Lee Harman. On September 7, 1960, however, NBA Commissioner Maurice Podoloff voided the trade. According to an AP article that ran in several papers on September 8, Podoloff voided the trade because “Warley’s college class doesn’t graduate until January, 1961 and he will be ineligible for NBA play until then.” (Note: the AP article identifies the second player going from the Hawks to the Lakers as “rookie Len Harmon”, but this seems to be referring to a player named Lee Harman, who had been the Hawks’ 4th round pick in 1959, out of Oregon State. Harman never actually played in the NBA.)

From the above, it's obvious that the trade was voided due to some issue with Warley's rights, but I'm not sure exactly what the problem was. The Lakers had selected Warley on the 4th round of the 1960 draft. It appears that, for draft purposes, he was considered to be a junior at the time, if his college class wasn't scheduled to graduate until January 1961. I think Warley was a junior eligible, but I am not certain of this. It isn't clear to me if Podoloff was saying that Warley wasn't actually eligible for the draft, or if he had been a junior eligible but the Lakers' rights to him had lapsed, or if the Lakers validly held his rights but couldn't trade them for some reason. Further discussion of Warley can be found in the thread below:

http://apbr.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3468
MCT
 
Posts: 899
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 5:41 pm

Postby John Grasso » Fri Jan 07, 2011 1:42 pm

MCT wrote: Harman never actually played in the NBA.


Harman did play in the ABL - 72 games for Hawaii the first year and 9 games for Long Beach the second year.

His non-basketball career was a lot more interesting.

He grew up on the back lots of the 20th Century Fox studios in the Los
Angeles area where his father was in charge of landscaping the studio property. After playing in the ABL Lee was employed by Fox as an assistant to his father. While there he decided he wanted to become a make-up artist and became quite successful in that field - working on more than 85 films.

http://www.thefridayflyer.com/FF-2005-2-4/FFS-1416.htm
John Grasso
 
Posts: 613
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 11:54 am
Location: Guilford, NY

Postby mtamada » Sun Jan 09, 2011 4:53 am

A trade to add to the original list:

The Sonics acquired David Thompson from Denver for Wally Walker and a 1st round draft choice. But there was something in Walker's contract ... or maybe he was injured at the time or something ... anyway the trade was invalidated. So the Sonics replaced Walker in the trade with Bill Hanzlik.

Which transformed what would've been somewhat bad trade for the Sonics into a terrible trade, as Thompson only lasted a couple of more years in the NBA whereas Hanzlik became a unique utility player, a 5-position player who the Nuggets liked to sic on Ralph Sampson because Hanzlik was so adept at harassing him (despite Hanzlike being swingman size). I don't know who Hanzlik compares to ... maybe a predecessor to Bo Outlaw.

The NY Times has a short article, and the aborted trade and final trade are listed at b-r.com

Talk about butterfly effects. This seemingly minor trade of a career benchwarmer and washed-up superstar would have profound later effects on the Sonics. Walker was a mere bench player, but went on to get an MBA and return to basketball in the Sonics' front office eventually becoming President and GM. Despite his forward-looking use of statistically-oriented analysts, the proud Sonics franchise (which didn't collect championships the way the Spurs, Pistons, and Rockets did, but like the Suns and Trailblazers could reliably be expected to win more games than they lost and even get into the Finals occasionally) gradually got weaker and weaker with various fruitless draft picks and free agent signings, and now the team is no more.

Imagine if whatever that weird no-trade clause was had not existed, and Walker had gone to the Nuggets. Maybe he'd have run the team instead of Dan Issel, and maybe the Sonics would still be in Seattle.
mtamada
 
Posts: 544
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2007 12:17 am

Postby meej » Sun Jan 09, 2011 10:38 pm

The article suggests that Walker could not be traded because he was a free agent, not under contract at the time of the trade.
meej
 
Posts: 616
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2009 1:39 pm

Postby rlee » Mon Jan 10, 2011 12:06 am

So just how good would OKC be if they hadn't rescinded the trade for Tyson Chandler?
rlee
President
 
Posts: 7436
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2007 5:42 pm
Location: sacramento

Postby MCT » Mon Jan 10, 2011 3:41 pm

meej wrote:The article suggests that Walker could not be traded because he was a free agent, not under contract at the time of the trade.

That was the arbitrator’s conclusion. There was more to the story than that, though. The Sonics argued that Walker‘s contract hadn’t yet expired at the time of the trade, thus allowing him to be traded. Contemporary newspaper articles in the Google News Archive suggest that Seattle believed Walker’s contract didn’t expire until August. Within a few days of the trade, however, the Players’ Association had challenged Walker’s inclusion in it. An AP article from June 26 (about ten days after the trade) quotes Walker as saying, “The whole thing is out of my hands right now. I have no idea what is going to happen. The Players’ Association didn’t like the trade so it decided to appeal it. The appeal wasn’t my idea, it wasn’t done on my request. But I guess I’m glad they’re doing it”.

From the newspaper articles, it appears that Walker’s prior contract had some kind of nonstandard language in it, though the articles don’t specify exactly what. In an AP article that ran on June 19, 1982, Denver GM Carl Sheer describes Walker’s status as “clouded”, and refers to the “uniqueness” of his contract. Walker apparently had a player option for the 1982-83 season which he did not exercise. One possibility that occurs to me is that he may have had an August deadline to notify the Sonics whether he wanted to pick up the option. The Players’ Association may have argued that as soon as Walker formally notified the Sonics that he was declining the option, he was a free agent, while the Sonics may have argued that he didn’t technically become a free agent until the deadline passed. This is just speculation on my part, though. (This type of situation couldn’t happen today. All players whose contracts expire now become free agents on July 1; any options must be exercised before that date. It is no longer possible to have a later date written into a contract. A player also cannot be traded after the season ends if there is any possibility that he might become a free agent on July 1. A player in Walker’s situation could not be traded unless and until he exercised the option for the following season.)

If the Sonics had prevailed, the Nuggets would have been in the odd position of acquiring a player who was set to become a free agent before the start of the next season. While this opened up the possibility that the Nuggets could lose Walker before he ever played a game for them, NBA free agency rules of the era made it unlikely that Walker would get away for nothing even if he chose not to re-sign. The Nuggets would have held a right of first refusal over Walker. As is the case with restricted free agents today, the mere existence of the right of first refusal sometimes made it difficult for free agents to get offers from other teams. If Walker did sign an offer sheet with another team, Denver could have matched it and kept him. The Nuggets also could have negotiated compensation from the other team in exchange for agreeing not to exercise their right of first refusal over Walker. If Denver matched another team’s offer, but decided that they didn’t want to keep Walker under his new contract terms, they would have had no restrictions on subsequently trading him (either to the team that tendered him the offer sheet, or to a third team).

The newspaper articles leave me with the impression that the Players’ Association was expected to prevail all along, and it was anticipated that another player would be substituted for Walker if the arbitrator ruled that he couldn’t be traded. A July 21 AP article quotes a spokesman for the Sonics as saying that Seattle “offered the Nuggets three players, and they selected Bill [Hanzlik] from among the three. We are not divulging the names of the other two players.” Any guesses as to who the other players may have been?

The rest of the story: On October 4, Walker re-signed with the Sonics, inking a one-year, $240,000 deal. The next day, he was traded to the Rockets for a 2nd round draft choice. Given the timing, one might expect that there was a pre-arranged agreement between Walker and the two teams to send him to Houston, and there was perhaps some technical reason that made it advantageous for Walker to re-sign with Seattle first. This wasn’t the case. Walker stated that he was surprised by the trade, and didn’t know Seattle had any plans to move him. He had elected to re-sign with the Sonics simply because he hadn’t received any solid offers from other teams, who were perhaps wary that Seattle would just match any offer anyway.
MCT
 
Posts: 899
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 5:41 pm

Postby tpakrac » Mon Jan 10, 2011 6:52 pm

Radja's take on rescinded trade with Philadelphia, written by the late legend Phil Jasner:

Posted on Wed, Nov. 12, 2008
Dino Radja recalls short time with Sixers
By PHIL JASNER
Philadelphia Daily News

So how did Dino Radja enjoy his "career" with the 76ers, all 4 days of it?
Dino Radja? Only those of you truly steeped in the history of the team would even understand the question. But Radja, then with the Boston Celtics, was traded here June 20, 1997, for Clarence Weatherspoon and Michael Cage. The deal was rescinded June 24, when Radja, coming off knee surgery, failed his physical.
"I was here 1 day," he said last night, before the Sixers faced the Utah Jazz. "If I saw it, I'd remember the hospital. I went to the ground floor, took my exam. My leg was weak, and the doctor told me the general manager [Billy King] thought I wouldn't be able to play back-to-back games or practice every day, that I'd have to rest.
"I went back to Europe, played great for 4 years, played 2 more after that. I needed some time to heal. I wasn't happy with the trade. I was playing for Rick Pitino, and he said he liked a guy who could score 20 points, get 10 rebounds. A few days down the road, I got a phone call telling me I'm traded, which was not fair."
Radja had missed 57 games with the Celtics, which is why then-Sixers president Pat Croce said "there's a risk" in the deal.
"Otherwise," Croce said at the time, "we would have done your basic A-B-C physical."
It's all just a memory now. Radja is the president of the team in Split, Croatia, where he once was a star. He was meeting with several members of Comcast-Spectacor's executive staff because Global Spectrum - the public assembly facility management subsidiary of the company - has the contract to manage the Spaladium, the new arena in Split scheduled to open next month.
"It's a different system over there," he said. "I wanted to see how we could work together. I've been through the system here, I like the possibilities we've been talking about.
"I've said I will do 6 years of voluntary work, take no money, in fact spend my own money. That's because somebody's father helped me a long time ago. I have to give something back to other kids. That's my major idea."
tpakrac
 
Posts: 330
Joined: Fri Feb 26, 2010 2:32 pm
Location: Varazdin, Croatia

Postby mtamada » Mon Jan 10, 2011 8:36 pm

MCT wrote:A July 21 AP article quotes a spokesman for the Sonics as saying that Seattle “offered the Nuggets three players, and they selected Bill [Hanzlik] from among the three. We are not divulging the names of the other two players.” Any guesses as to who the other players may have been?


Danny Vranes is an obvious choice, a young benchwarming small forward like the other two. (Actually Hanzlik played mainly guard for the Sonics -- including doing a lot of awkward-looking ballhandling -- but was clearly a swingman in nature. John Johnson had just played his final season, IIRC he suffered a career-ending injury and the Sonics still lacked a classic point guard so maybe Lenny Wilkens was trying to use Hanzlik in JJ's point forward role.)

The third player is harder to guess. Greg Kelser was another young benchwarming SF, but was clearly injured goods (we could list him in the devastating injuries thread, except I believe that he suffered his career-shortening injury in college, rather than in the NBA.)

James Donaldson was a young clunky backup center still learning how to play basketball. I thought he had more potential than any of the SFs that we're listing -- and indeed he eventually developed into a literal all-star. But if the Sonics undervalued him, they might've offered him to the Nuggets, and if the Nuggets also undervalued him, they might've picked Hanzlik over Donaldson.

Ray Tolbert was a young PF who never developed, he might've looked similar in value to Walker and Hanzlik.

Going in the opposite career direction, Phil Smith was a former all-star who the Sonics might've thrown onto the offer-to-Denver pile. (Smith was out of the league by age 30 -- didn't he also suffer some catastrophic injury that shortened his career, i.e. another guy for the Devastating Injury list?)

Similar to Smith, the Sonics had other players who they could've thrown into the pile, but I think they would've been so obviously of lesser value that the Sonics wouldn't have bothered to offer them.

An AP article from June 26 (about ten days after the trade) quotes Walker as saying, “The whole thing is out of my hands right now. I have no idea what is going to happen. The Players’ Association didn’t like the trade so it decided to appeal it. The appeal wasn’t my idea, it wasn’t done on my request. But I guess I’m glad they’re doing it”.


An interesting quote, by a player who was clearly aware of various legalistic and political machinations going on behind the scenes that were directly affecting his career, but who equally clearly didn't know the details. Going back to butterfly effect speculation, maybe this sparked his interest in NBA front office machinations, leading to his subsequent career choice to run an NBA team.
mtamada
 
Posts: 544
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2007 12:17 am

Does this one count?

Postby rlee » Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:32 am

12-man deal between Philadelphia, LA Lakers, Detroit, and Miami. It involved Iverson and Geiger going to Detroit, Philadelphia getting Eddie Jones from Charlotte, Glen Rice from LA, and Jerome Williams from Detroit. But Matt Geiger had a 15% trade "kicker" to be paid by any team acquiring him written into his contract. Detroit would only go through with the deal if Geiger waived that obligation. Geiger refused. Trade was scuttled.
rlee
President
 
Posts: 7436
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2007 5:42 pm
Location: sacramento

Re: Does this one count?

Postby MCT » Thu Jan 13, 2011 3:29 pm

rlee wrote:12-man deal between Philadelphia, LA Lakers, Detroit, and Miami. It involved Iverson and Geiger going to Detroit, Philadelphia getting Eddie Jones from Charlotte, Glen Rice from LA, and Jerome Williams from Detroit. But Matt Geiger had a 15% trade "kicker" to be paid by any team acquiring him written into his contract. Detroit would only go through with the deal if Geiger waived that obligation. Geiger refused. Trade was scuttled.

I don't think that one counts. It doesn't sound like it was rescinded. It sounds like it was called off at the last second, without having actually happened, because Geiger wouldn't waive his trade kicker.

Along similar lines, a trade between Dallas and New Jersey during the 2007-08 season was called off at the last second after Devean George wouldn't consent to being included in the trade. George didn't actually have a no-trade clause in his contract (no-trade clauses are very rare in the NBA), but the intersection of a couple of obscure salary cap rules created a situation where he could not be traded without his consent. The deal, which was to send Jason Kidd to the Mavericks, was ultimately re-worked with a different combination of players.
MCT
 
Posts: 899
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 5:41 pm

Postby MCT » Thu Jan 13, 2011 4:26 pm

Mike’s mention of John Johnson reminded me of another more-or-less rescinded trade that he was involved in.

On June 9, 1977, the Rockets traded Johnson to the Celtics for two 2nd round picks, one in that year’s draft (the trade happened the day before the draft), one the following year. That fall, Johnson duly reported to training camp with the Celtics. Around the same time, Boston received Johnson’s contract in the mail from Houston. Upon reviewing the contract, Red Auerbach claimed that the Rockets had misled him about the terms of the contract and attempted to nullify the trade. The dispute apparently centered on the amount of guaranteed money in the contract.

Rockets GM Ray Patterson refused to reverse the trade. Patterson felt that he had adequately described the terms of Johnson’s contract to Auerbach at the time of the trade, and expressed surprise that Auerbach would find the amount of guaranteed money to be unusual for a player of Johnson’s experience and stature. For most of training camp, the two teams were locked in a stalemate. As I understand it, Auerbach essentially refused to include Johnson on his team, and sent him home from training camp. Johnson was stuck in limbo, waiting for the two teams to resolve things.

NBA Commissioner Larry O’Brien ultimately stepped in to mediate the dispute. On October 18 (which happened to be opening night of the regular season), O’Brien ordered Johnson returned to Houston, but allowed the Rockets to keep the two draft picks. O'Brien credited the Celtics’ position that they had not adequately understood the terms of Johnson’s contract, and felt that they should not be required to take it on. He felt that the Celtics had contributed to the confusion, however, and that Houston had not willfully misrepresented the contract terms. In light of that, he allowed the Rockets to keep the picks. Newspaper reports indicate that both teams seemed reasonably happy with the resolution. Though the Celtics ended up with neither Johnson nor the picks, Red Auerbach’s main concern seems to have been getting out from under a contract that he found onerous – whether that belief was really justified or not – and he was able to achieve that goal.

The Rockets had moved on without Johnson, and no longer particularly wanted him. On October 22, four days after his return, they traded him to the Sonics for the same price they had originally received from Boston: two 2nd round picks (Johnson appeared in one game for Houston prior to the trade). In the end, Seattle gave up two 2nd round picks and got Johnson, Houston gave up Johnson and got four second round picks, and Boston gave up two second round picks and got nothing.
MCT
 
Posts: 899
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 5:41 pm

Postby mtamada » Fri Jan 14, 2011 12:36 am

Great story about the bizarre happenings behind the John Johnson trade ... I'd always been fuzzy on how/why the Sonics acquired him. Those were the days when the Sonics, despite the disarray with their coaching and on the floor, had the golden touch with player acquisition, acquiring Marvin Webster and Paul Silas for Tom Burleson and Bob Wilkerson, drafting the unheralded small-college Jack Sikma, drafting Dennis Johnson in the second round, signing Gus Williams as a free agent, etc. Even their losing moves either turned into winners, or would have turned into winners. Meaning: losing Marvin Webster to the Knicks meant they got Lonnie Shelton as compensation. Trading for Tom LaGarde turned out badly because he suffered one of those Devastating Injuries (BTW he needs to be on the Devastating Injury list, I think it was a knee)-- but until he got injured, he and the Sonics were playing great.

When they got a coach (Lenny Wilkens) who could turn their disarray into a forerunner of the late 1980s Pistons (defensively oriented team that relied on its 3-guard rotation for scoring, with a relative lack of superstars on both teams), nothing could stop the Sonics. (Nothing that is except Magic Johnson reviving the Lakers in 1980, and Gus Williams sitting out the season in 1981.)
mtamada
 
Posts: 544
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2007 12:17 am

Re: Rescinded Trades

Postby Robert Bradley » Thu Feb 14, 2013 5:37 am

I found another one the other day -

19Nov61 Chicago trades Barney Cable, Ralph Davis and Archie Dees to St. Louis for Joe Graboski, Si Green, Fred LaCour, Woody Sauldsberry and a player to be named on the 15Dec61 roster cut-down date, trade rescinded 21Nov61 when NBA Commissioner Maurice Podoloff ruled that it was in violation of an agreement that none of the players selected in 1961 expansion draft could be traded for one year without approval of the NBA Board of Governors. Chicago then traded Cable and Dees to St. Louis for Graboski, Green and Sauldsberry on 22Nov61.
Author of THE BASKETBALL DRAFT FACT BOOK: A HISTORY OF PROFESSIONAL BASKETBALL'S COLLEGE DRAFTS
Available at https://Rowman.com

Robert Bradley's Pro Basketball History Revisited Blog
http://apbrbasketball.blogspot.com/
Robert Bradley
Emeritus
 
Posts: 1076
Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 5:39 am
Location: Phoenix, AZ


Return to General Discussions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests